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Beauty Beware: Is Deva Curl a Natural’s Disaster

Hair — the amount, condition, and location — can be a great source of stress for anyone.

Finding what works best for you takes time, research, and a lot of trial and error.

With expert-level knowledge gained through YouTube videos and articles, the average consumer can develop a vast hair salon dictionary that can rival a trained professional’s. Some terms, however, are prevalent to the point that even a novice is sure to have encountered them—specifically, the vexing seven-letter “P” word.

Product. Product. Product.

This umbrella term, while frustrating, lends itself to the mystery of successful product acquisition, in that everyone’s hair story is different, and it’s your responsibility to find what works best for you.

The hassle of maintaining healthy textured hair can lead to longing looks at clippers, straighteners, and relaxers, so imagine the immense relief one feels when finding a curl company that has “everything curls need and nothing they don’t.”

DevaCurl, an American hair care brand founded in 1994, seemed to be just that, a company that claims to be as passionate about healthy hair as their curly clients. With countless testimonies and “simple ingredient” products, investing in them (and yourself) seems like a no-brainer. 

As someone who has used DevaCurl, the high price and lack of change in the appearance of my curls was enough to deter me, but for some curl enthusiasts, these budget-busting products had too many benefits to ignore.

That is, until former DevaCurl user, influencer, and Priyanka Truther, Ayesha Malik, seemed to open the floodgates with her video “Why I Stopped Using DevaCurl.”

Although others have ditched the products before, Malik’s video, with over 2 million views, shed light on the toll, she believes these products have taken on her hair and body. 

“This is my official statement. If you’ve bought diva curl products because of me, I am sorry. And if you’re currently using these products, stop immediately,” said Ayesha in the 16-minute video. “I’ve spent thousands of hours taking care of the health of my hair only for it to be stripped away from me just like that.”

With an influx of similar videosFacebook support groups, and class action lawsuits, there seems to be no denying the link between DevaCurl products and hair loss, curl damage, and scalp problems. 

The DevaCurl company, however, appears to disagree.

In a statement released meant to address the concerns of their “beloved curl community,” they insists they are “partnering with medical professionals, dermatologists, industry experts, professional stylists, and members of our curl community to better address your needs and concerns,” but accepts no responsibility for the issues their users are experiencing.

“We’ve heard you and recognize that any changes to your hair – for whatever reason – demand a special type of attention that safety tests alone can’t address.”

Some may find it strange that although DevaCurl cannot be sure of their hair hazard status, their frequently asked questions promote continued use, “with confidence as all products are safe to use.”

While not all users are experiencing adverse effects, some are choosing to support their friends and eliminate the chance that their lovely locks will soon turn into limp loops.

If you are among those that need to start searching for new products, we understand it can be a daunting and costly task, but using the Think Dirty app may be a good starting point. Recommended to Malik by Shai “The Curl Doctor” Amiel, this app helps consumers find nontoxic beauty products.

The DevaCurl nightmare is far from over. While we are curious about what is going on here, hopefully, for the sake of those suffering, they can find the answers they need soon.

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